The Princess Affair – Nell Stark (Bold Strokes Books)

96
800×600

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;}

Buy it direct from Bold Strokes Books

I’ll confess to being an Anglophile. I have box sets of
“Monty Python’s Flying Circus,” “Absolutely Fabulous,” “Keeping Up
Appearances,” and “Are You Being Served?”I do not, however, follow the
royals as slavishly as some of my fellow lovers of the UK. That did not prevent
me from thoroughly enjoying Nell Stark’s The Princess Affair.

Kerry Donovan, Rhodes scholar, is in Oxford to study. Her
distractions should only be football and an occasional sightseeing excursion,
but she never counted on falling in love with a princess—especially one so
stunning as Princess Alexendra Victoria Jane, who the British tabs have
nicknamed “Sassy Sasha.” But Sasha’s well-publicized flings with male members
of the jet-set are meant to obscure her true sexuality. England is used to
commoner/royal romances, but what about between two women?

Stark breathes some new life into this old storyline by
marching her complex characters through their paces with startling verisimilitude.
Since she has studied at Oxford, she has first-hand knowledge of the
surroundings, and she uses her not-inconsiderable gift for setting the scene to
give us a perfect backdrop for a love story.

In addition to her lesbianism, Sasha has another secret that
drives the plot. She’s dyslexic, an unfortunate condition for someone called
upon to memorize and recite speeches. This antipathy to studying and
intellectual exercise has wrongly branded her stupid, another obstacle to
loving a Rhodes scholar. Her testy relationship with her father, the King, is
also a lovely complication.

Stark’s writing is not histrionic or given to the hyperbole
sometimes found in romances. That’s not to say it’s flat or emotionless—quite
the opposite is true. In true British fashion, it’s restrained but still packs
a punch. Her dialogue is also superb—always conversational and never feels
scripted.

So even if you’ve read this particular plot before, I can
guarantee you that Stark’s fresh take will have you cheering for Sasha and
Kerry to get together in the end. Will they? Well, you’ll just have to find out
for yourself.  

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;}

©, 2013, Jerry Wheeler

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s