A Horse Named Sorrow – Trebor Healey (Terrace Books/University of Wisconsin Press)

96
800×600

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;}

Buy it now from Amazon.com

If Trebor Healey knows anything, he knows the road. He
understands that growth is not in resting but in moving—listening to the
thousands of stories told in the cabs of semis and worn leatherette cushions of
diners. He’s shown this to some extent in his first novel, Through it Came
Bright Colors
and the journey of his fantasy Faun, but A Horse
Named Sorrow
brings it home like a hard day of hitching.

Twenty-one year old Seamus Blake meets the man of his
dreams, HIV positive Jimmy Keane, in San Francisco. Their coupling is
passionate yet short as Jimmy falls ill, Shame (as Seamus is nicknamed), caring
for him until he dies. He promises Jimmy he’ll take his ashes back to Buffalo
NY, where Jimmy is from. So he embarks on a cross-country road trip on Jimmy’s
old bike, festooned with twine and strings Jimmy picked up on his way out West,
trying to ride his way out of grief and into a new life.

Healey melds Catholicism, Buddhism, Sixties and Seventies
pop music, American Indian mysticism, Crazy Horse Malt Liquor, and a love of
pancakes in a dense, yet never heavy word salad as amusing as it is
heart-wrenching. It could be a confusing melange, but Healey’s innate sense of
structure brings all these elements (and more) together into a plainly
sorted-out whole.

The star of the show is, of course, Seamus Blake—a
fascinating character that fears and wonders as deeply as he loves. He’s had
his first taste of what true commitment feels like and it doesn’t scare him. It
invigorates him. He may be distracted by who he meets on the road, in
particular a boy named Eugene who reappears many times throughout the last
third of the book, but Shame’s heart is true and his intentions are good, and you
know that if it’s within his power, he’ll make it to Buffalo.

Healey’s prose is nothing short of incredible—lyric, sharply
focused, funny, ironic, and energetic, moving effortlessly from present to past
to possible future and back again, as moving and hypnotic as the broken white
lines of the highway Shame travels. Healey is an unquestionably gifted writer,
and one of the most emotionally imaginative voices we have telling our stories
to the world.

If you’ve never read Trebor Healey before, you should. And A
Horse Named Sorrow
is a perfect place to start, but be warned. You might
just find yourself selling the house and buying a bike.  

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;}

©, 2013, Jerry Wheeler

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s